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Adventure & Adrenaline

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Adventure & Adrenaline

While we’re all prone to the temptation of a duvet day on holiday, it’s worth mentioning that the outdoor bits of Wales really are quite lovely. Here are some activities to put some colour back in your cheeks.

 

 
  • Coasteering in Pembrokeshire
    If jumping off cliffs, scrambling around rocks and exploring caves might seem a bit too devil-may-care, banish that apprehension immediately. With an experienced guide by your side, coasteering becomes an utterly liberating experience. And where better to do it than in Pembrokeshire, the first place on the planet to offer guided coasteering trips. The options are plentiful, from cliff-jumps at Abereiddi, to the whitewater playground around St David’s Head. www.visitpembrokeshire.com
  • Surfing on Gower
    A way of life for people brought up in the area, Gower’s coast has a broad range of surfing spots. There are gentle swells in broad bays (Llangennith), challenging reef breaks (Langland Bay) and plenty more besides. The waves are relatively modest in size, so this is an ideal environment in which to learn. There are several businesses offering board hire and tuition. A safe tip is to check tide times and take a stroll along the Wales Coast Path to check out the waves first. It saves those uncomfortable hours sitting on the beach in your wetsuit waiting for the tide to hit the right spot. www.visitswanseabay.com
     
  • Walking the Anglesey Coast Path
    Anglesey is a must-visit destination for amblers, explorers and meanderers alike. There are nearly 125 miles (201 km) of coastal pathways around the island at the northern tip of Wales, featuring ancient Celtic ruins and dramatic clifftop views overlooking an RSPB nature reserve. Then there’s one of the most famous Welsh castles at Beaumaris, ancient burial chambers a dramatic lighthouse at South Stack, the wonderful Menai Strait and its abundant shellfish, and the rare flora and fauna. As nature goes, it’s pretty action-packed. www.visitanglesey.co.uk
     
 
 
  • White-water Rafting in Cardiff
    While all the sensible people in the meeting were on a comfort break, someone had the great idea to build some white-water rapids in Cardiff, the Welsh capital. The Cardiff International White Water centre is practically in the shadow of two of Wales’s finest contemporary buildings – the National Assembly for Wales and the Wales Millennium Centre. It features white water rafting, kayaking and indoor surfing and has become one of the most popular destinations of its kind in the UK. www.ciww.com, www.visitcardiff.com
     
  • Horse Riding in the Brecon Beacons
    There’s trekking, riding and hacking activities galore in the Brecon Beacons National Park, with five riding centres working together to provide a range of options for visitors. One ride even fits pub stopovers into the itinerary. The national park covers 500 square miles (805 square km) and the Beacons are high on the list of any must-visit destinations. So why not explore them on horseback? www.midwalesmyway.com, www.breconbeacons.org
  • For active ideas of what to do throughout Wales, visit: www.visitwales.com/holidays-breaks/short-breaks/activity-breaks 
     
 
  • UKInbound Member 2017
  • Association of Group Travel Organisers
  • ETOA Member 2017
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